Want Another Pup? Here’s How To Know When You Should Get A Second Dog

by Avery
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Does your puppy need a friend? It can be tempting to get another buddy for your pup. They get a friendly canine companion to keep them occupied when you’re at work, and you get another addition to your fluffy family. But adopting a second dog is not a decision to be made lightly, and there are various factors you should seriously consider before making the decision either way.

Here are three questions to ask to help determine whether or not your pup should stay an only child.

should I get a second dog?

1. How old is your current dog?

Double the puppies can often cause double the damage. If your current pooch Is still a puppy or hasn’t finished obedience training, adding another pup could mess up your entire dynamic. It’s like giving a toddler a partner in crime. They’ll act out with increasing frequency because they have someone else in their corner. Conversely, an elderly dog may not appreciate a lively new roommate when they want to enjoy their golden years in peace.

Most pet experts recommend waiting until your current dog is at least one before introducing another member to the family. This ensures you and your dog have a healthy and stable bond and reduces the risk that bringing in another puppy will cause a rift in you and your dog’s relationship.

when should I get a second dog?

2. Do you have the time, space, and resources for another animal?

Dogs, like humans, can be pretty possessive of what they claim as their ‘territory’ whether that be food bowls, toys, or their spot on the bed. This is something to keep in mind if you have a limited amount of living space because multiple dog beds and individual toys can take up a lot more space than anticipated. Additionally, numerous vet bills can be pretty expensive, so keep your budget in mind when making a decision.

should I get a second dog?

3. How does your dog act around other animals?

Dogs are inherently social creatures, and having a playmate can do wonders for their mental health. However, not all dogs prefer canine company or even desire it in the first place. If you are seriously considering ]another puppy, try taking your dog to a dog park and watch how they interact and play with the other dogs. Try to identify what your dog is looking for in a playmate in terms of energy levels, age, and size.

Remember, the goal is for the two dogs to be able to play and interact safely, so if you notice your dog is uncomfortable with larger or particularly enthusiastic canines, that’s something to keep in the back of your mind when making a decision.

 

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